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. i think we have agreed that as the distinguished alumnus of harvard said washington as a town with northern charm and southern efficiency. let's assume we go through the fiscal cliff. immigration, corporate tax reform, and investments. emigration, you're not doing the dramatic. vietor due to comprehensive immigration but we did not have a chance to do it. both wings cayman decided it would sabotage it. maybe republicans learned the lesson but i am not sure how much of a lesson. the way that was financed was through the corporate tax increase but there -- that had people on both sides will in to work with the white house and congress. when you talk about infrastructure spending and investments in things we have done with nih, all the talk now is about death. >-- how do you do what the ambitious and admirable the agenda envisions? >> will have the discussion of the debt ceiling again in january. we're not getting away from the somewhat of a doomsday scenario for quite some time. which would allow us to get to glen's position. it is important because the priorities that you outli
would help the federal regime. >> they look to washington over the next few years and see that the ideas are not working. they're dragging us down. when washington hits a wall, which we know they will, the friends of freedom here in south carolina and all over the country are going to be ready, not with political ideas but with american ideas, ideas that we know are working and can point to and show that they're working for 100% of americans. that's what i'm going to be doing the next few years. i'm not getting out of the fight. i'm raising my game. i know that i have got a partner now in tim scott as well as lindsey graham and governor haley and all of you that are here today. i am so grateful for the opportunity to serve. i promise you and i'm going to keep serving and fighting in the same way that you have seen in the past. thank you. [applause] >> and i can tell you that one of the things as i travel across the country, everyone always wants to know how in the world we got the best federal delegation in the country. all i tell them is that south carolina is blessed. we
is really terrific is the bipartisan spirit. carol and i are going down to washington at a time with the hyper partisanship. people are really divided. what i really want to do is bring common sense, bring those granite state values. women have always worked in new hampshire, since the mills. look at new hampshire history, women have worked for generations. if you want something done, you ask a busy woman. look at the folks around this room. what i feel is we are not unique in this ability, but we do know how to bring people together to get things done. that is the most important quality that any of us could bring, certainly what governor elective hassan is going to face in the state. we all need to come to get there. men and women. our country needs our help. >> a great point. fill. you are the second woman governor in the state -- you feel a weight on your shoulders as a role model? >> i think all leaders want to do a really good job. i feel an enormous responsibility to serve the people of new hampshire as well as i can and leave the state a better place, even as good as it i
on the poor. there's an article in today's -- in "the washington post" on december 19, job boehner's plan b would raise taxes on the poor. really? i mean, is that how you're going to balance the budget? by sticking it to people who already are in vulnerable times? this is wrong. my friends talk about the debt, the deficit, but what they don't talk about is that we have fought two wars, in iraq and afghanistan, and we haven't paid for it. all on our credit card. we send our young men and women into harm's way and we ask them and their families to sacrifice and we do nothing. we just put the bill on our credit card. a few months ago the chairman of the budget committee, mr. ryan, says about $1.3 trillion, i think he's low-balling it, but $1.3 trillion on our debt and nobody over there says a word. they all go after programs like social security and medicare and food stamps. so, mr. speaker, i ask that we defeat the previous question and if we defeat the previous question i will offer an amendment to this rule to make in order an amendment which will allow the house to have a chance to vote on
in the white house. tonight, on c-span. >> columnist george will spoke recently at washington university in saint louis about the role of religion and politics. it was hosted by the center on religion and politics will hear from former senator john danfor th, just before mr. we will speaks. >> finally, it is my honor to introduce senator john danforth, who will introduce mr. will. the senator is a partner with the law firm. he graduated with honors from princeton university, where he majored in religion. he received a bachelor of divinity degree from yale divinity school and a bachelor of laws degree from yale law school. he practiced law for some years and began his political career in 1968 when he was elected attorney general of missouri in his first place for public office. missouri voters elected him to the u.s. senate in 1976. they reelected him in 1982 and 1988, for a total of 18 years of service. the senator initiated major legislation in international trade, telecommunications, health care, research and development, transportation, and civil rights. he was later appointed special
. the clerk: the speaker's room, washington, d.c., december 19, 2012. i hereby appoint the honorable daniel webster to act as speaker pro tempore on this day. signed, john a. boehner, speaker of the house of representatives. the speaker pro tempore: the chair will receive a message. the messenger: mr. speaker, a message from the senate. the secretary: mr. speaker. the speaker pro tempore: madam secretary. the secretary: i have been directed by the senate to inform the house that the senate has agreed to s. res. 624, relative to the death of the honorable daniel k. inouye, senator from the state of ohio. -- hawaii. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to the order of the house of january 17, 2012, the chair will now recognize members from lists submitted by the majority and minority leaders for morning hour debate. the chair will alternate recognition between the parties with each party limited to one hour and each member other than the majority and minority leaders and the minority whip each, to five minutes but in no event shall debate continue beyond 11:50 a.m. the chair recognizes the gent
in washington, thanks to you to the bank of america. thanks to you, john, and thanks to your colleagues. so you may have gotten cards. we're be bringing you into the conversation. so be thinking about what you're going to ask. so without further ado, we'll bring in bob woodward. mr. woodward. [applause] >> which is your chair? >> you get the daddy chair. >> thank you. >> so the price of politics, which has become a bestseller, as all your books do, looked at the last cliff, negotiations over the previous grand bargain that didn't quite get over the finish line. what does that teach us about the current cliff negotiations? >> well, it's groundhog day. the question is who's playing bill murray. and i mean, such a repetition. it's the same players at the same seats at the table with the same doctrines. so where this goes, i think anyone who thinks they know is wrong. some people say it's a fiscal cliff. some people say it's a slope. some say it's a bungee jump. some say it's a skateboard trip. it's going to go down and up and so forth. bottom line, i think, it's no way to govern. it is a giant mis
, which stands out to you? >> "mr. smith goes to washington." no matter what your politics are, i cannot imagine anyone watching that film not being somehow moved to have a voice. to be able to put a voice to experience and your point of view. i suppose that gets me every time. >> good choice. >> mine was "it's a wonderful life." it was a snapshot of an imagined america. but maybe in america that was also at its best. to the extent that was a window to the rest of the world, people at their best. >> david? >> my reaction was "saturday night live." [laughter] i love politics, i love the sport of politics. i find it fascinating. between saturday night live in jon stewart, -- and jon stewart,i like satire. >> i am going to cheat and say "12 angry men." >> all of holland came to a stop at 7:00 on monday night. peyton place. >> really? >> thank you very much. [captioning performed by national captioning institute] [captions copyright national cable satellite corp. 2012] >> coming up on c-span -- talks about the judicial system with supreme court justices stephen briar and anthony kennedy. and
been like. follow clifton truman daniel sunday on c-span 3. 9:00 p.m. eastern. "washington journal" continues. att: this week we're looking the united states long-term energy outlook. we will use a new report that came out this week from the u.s. energy information administration that protect u.s. energy consumption out to the year 2014. adam sieminski is the administrator of the eia. missionwhat the eia's is. guest: it is one of the 14 of the independent statistical agencies here in washington. we are responsible for energy information. we are by law -- it is supposed to be unbiased and neutral in our development of energy analysis, using the debt that we collect -- data that we collect. the annual energy outlook reference case, which were published today, is not really a forecast as it is a baseline. it is built on the idea of existing law and regulation so that the public and policymakers can compare what new laws and regulations or changes in world events might mean to our baseline. host: frank verrastro doggett is vice president of the energy program at the nonprofit center fo
. and the more fair we are here in washington, you make more, you pay more. you make less you pay less. and i'm one of those that likes two deductions. one for charitable giving and the other for the mortgage interest dedux. we can negotiate over numbers. that's not a problem. we can compromise, we can reach an agreement, a compromise over numbers. but let's don't compromise on principle that is so basic, simply says, if you make more you pay more. it's an easy concept. you make more you pay more. you make less you pay less. that's fair. and for heaven's sake, let's do this and let's take that obamacare burden off the working poor in america that are going to get socked with that tax. and we were told for so long, if we don't do something, there will be 30 million, maybe 20 million, 30 million people in america who won't have insurance. and then we get to the bottom of it, we find out, well, now we're going to have lots of people pay lots more taxes and we're still -- oh, and we're gutting medicare in obamacare, we're gutting it $716 billion, so the seniors will have less health care. oh, i k
in my apartment here in washington, d.c., proudly i do. i would encourage support of this and i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from tennessee yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from california is recognized. mr. waxman: mr. speaker, we have no further requests for speakers on our side of the aisle to support this legislation. i know almost all democrats that i've talked to think it's a good bill. i've urged the others to join with them in supporting it. i think it's a worthwhile piece of legislation. it's a small step but it's a step in the right direction and it will clarify some issues that still need to be clarified. so let's get this done and in pursuit of that objective, i yield back the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentleman from california yields back the balance of his time. the gentleman from kentucky is recognized. mr. whitfield: i also want to urge everybody to support h.r. 6582, the small, modest energy efficiency bill, that will save some jobs. certainly want to thank the members of the senate,
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11

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